Thursday, 23 February 2012

Adobe abandons Flex

Adobe recently published the roadmap of Flex which they had donated to Apache. Since Flex was already an open sourced project, that was a logical step. However, the recent document showed Adobe has already abandoned the Apache's Flex. Here is an interesting part from the document.
Flash Player 11.2 and Adobe AIR 3.2, which are anticipated to ship in the first quarter of 2012, will be tested with applications built using Adobe Flex 4.6. Adobe will test future releases of Flash Player and AIR against the Adobe Flex 4.6 SDK and maintain backwards compatibility for five years.
Although Adobe tried to make it look friendly with the "backwards compability" keyword, this statement just shows Adobe is not planning to integrate anything done on Apache to Adobe's Flash Runtime. Actually they also make the more clear.
In the past, features were added to Flash Player and AIR specifically to support the needs of Flex applications. Going forward, features will be added to the runtimes to support Adobe’s vision for the Flash Platform. The Apache Flex Project may choose to take advantage of those features; however, new features will not be added to the runtimes specifically to support the Apache project’s efforts.
I am not sure if that is a joke but Flex was widely accepted just because of Flash Runtime and if Adobe is not going to support Apache's Flex on their runtime, expecting them to build a Flash clone, they are just wasting Apache's time and resources.

Adobe also announced they are abandoning the Flash Catalist which was planned to be an important tool for the new UI Architecture called Spark. They had spent years to built a lightweight UI framework optimized for mobile from scratch while abandoning the long waited Flash Mobile. They blamed Steve Jobs for not letting Flash in iPhone but the moment Flash player appeared on Android everyone realized it was slow, not good to use on touch screen and draining the battery just like Steve Jobs once said. Instead of making investment Adobe just pulled the plug of Flash on mobile saying they would invest those resources into Flex and Air.

It is quite clear, Flash's future is not clouded and more... it just doesn't have a future...

Quoting Vader, Adobe I find your lack of faith disturbing! Sadly I can't just force grip to choke you.